Surprise! Corcoran disses DWS

House Speaker Richard Corcoran ridiculed Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz for asking Florida lawmakers to convene a special session to deal with a Confederate statue in the nation’s capital.

Corcoran, a Land O’ Lakes Republican who may be pondering a run for governor, called the Broward County Democrat “out of touch” for making the request.

The Legislature voted in 2016 to replace Gen. Edmund Kirby Smith, a figure who critics say has a tenuous connection to the state, during a nationwide backlash against Confederate symbols in the wake of the 2015 shooting deaths of nine African-American worshippers at a historic black church in Charleston, S.C.

The latest dust-up over the statue of the civil war general comes as cities throughout Florida engage in sometimes heated debate over what to do with Confederate monuments, an issue obviously highlighted by the events in Charlottesville last weekend.
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Chris King got into the fray yesterday, demanding that all Confederate monuments be removed.

Tear down that monument! (Part II)

6264593750_0e2623f32d_oWe’re not suggesting it’s even a possibility.

But Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz is calling on Florida state lawmakers hold a special session to finalize plans to rid the state of its connection with a Civil War general who holds a place of honor at the National Statuary Hall in the nation’s capital.

The Legislature voted in 2016 to replace Gen. Edmund Kirby Smith, a figure who critics say has a tenuous connection to the state, during a nationwide backlash against Confederate symbols in the wake of the 2015 shooting deaths of nine African-American worshippers at a historic black church in Charleston, S.C.

But state legislators have since failed to agree on a replacement for Smith, leaving the general — and his successor — in limbo.

Following this weekend’s deadly clash in Charlottesville, sparked by the removal of a Confederate monument, Wasserman Schultz asked Florida lawmakers to hold a special session to address the issue.

“It’s time to stop playing games. No family visiting our nation’s Capitol should have to explain to their child that the statue representing our state honors someone who fought for a philosophy built on hatred and oppression. Governor Scott and the Florida legislature must take immediate action by calling a one-day special session during their upcoming interim committee meetings to pass a bill with one of the three recommendations from the committee established by law: Marjorie Stoneman Douglas, Mary McLeod Bethune or George Washington Jenkins. These three Floridians represent the best of the history of our state. The removal of the Confederate statue must be made an urgent priority,” Wasserman Schultz, a former head of the Democratic National Committee, said in a press release issued Tuesday.

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Chris King wants all confederate monuments in the Sunshine State removed. More about that here.

 

Tear down that monument!

Chris King, a Democrat who’s running for governor, left no doubt where he stands on the issue of Confederate monuments on public property.

King, a Winter Park businessman, wants them all gone.

“These monuments should be removed because we should not celebrate literal anti-American ideology or any ideology based on the oppression of any group of people,” King said in a statement. “And to those who say these monuments are needed to preserve our history, I say we don’t need memorials celebrating this dark time in our history. As we’ve seen in Charlottesville this weekend, we live with the legacy of this history every day.”

King issued the statement after a deadly clash in Charlottesville, Va., that left one person dead after a car plowed into a group of counterprotesters following a “Unite the Right” rally.

There’s a Confederate monument outside the state Capitol in Tallahassee, erected “to rescue from oblivion and perpetuate in the memory of succeeding generations the heroic patriotism of the men of Leon County who perished in the Civil War of 1861-1865,” according to the inscription.
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A number of Florida cities, including Jacksonville, are now grappling with what to do with the Confederate statues. Workers in Gainesville began tearing down a monument Monday outside the Alachua County Courthouse.

That’s the same city where white nationalist Richard Spencer, who participated in the Charlottesville event, may speak at the University of Florida next month.

Here’s King’s full statement:

“It’s time for the orderly removal all the Confederate monuments in Florida. These monuments should be removed because we should not celebrate literal anti-American ideology or any ideology based on the oppression of any group of people. And to those who say these monuments are needed to preserve our history, I say we don’t need memorials celebrating this dark time in our history. As we’ve seen in Charlottesville this weekend, we live with the legacy of this history every day.

“It’s time for Florida to put its fealty and energy not toward monuments to a divided past, but toward a vision of the future that provides for common growth. Florida values diversity, but simply saying so understates the case. Florida’s economic engine is built on diversity. We are a state of many races, faiths and languages, each making our state a great place to live in, and each underpinning our economy. But our economic engine has been held back for far too long by the ghosts of the past.

“Removing Confederate monuments is not just the right thing to do for Florida values and its citizens, but the smart thing to do for Florida’s economy. In order to unleash Florida’s economic potential, and attract the jobs and investment we need to grow into the national leader we should be, it’s time to position Florida as a state with eyes set on the future.”

By Lloyd Dunkelberger.

National Republicans target Nelson, en español

The National Republican Senatorial Committee doesn’t have a high-profile GOP candidate in the race — yet — but it’s  got a bullseye on incumbent Democrat Bill Nelson.

The national Republicans unleashed a Spanish-language radio ad in Miami, accusing  Nelson of having “aligned himself with communists and dictators.”

The ad equates Nelson’s support of President Barack Obama’s detente with Cuba to encouraging others like Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro, and notes that Nelson “even visited Hugo Chavez” in the now- embattled country.

It’s the kicker that really hurts: “If Bill Nelson supports murderers, I can’t support Bill Nelson.”

There’s been a lot of speculation that Gov. Rick Scott is preparing to run against Nelson next year, but Scott — who’s assembled a campaign team headed by Melissa Sellers Stone — hasn’t said yet what his plans are.

Here’s the translation of the radio ad:

Let’s see what’s happening in the world today
Look at this. Another horror in Venezuela.
Our government in Washington has to stop Maduro and his accomplices.
What has our Senator Bill Nelson done?
In the past, he has aligned himself with communists and dictators.
Look at him with Cuba. He supported Obama when he negotiated with the other terrorists, the Castro brothers.
When Nelson supports the Castros, that only reinforces and encourages others, like it did with Chavez and now with Maduro.
In 2005, Bill Nelson even visited Hugo Chavez in Venezuela.
Here it says Nelson went to Venezuela to admire Chavez’s revolution.
If Bill Nelson supports murderers, I can’t support Bill Nelson.

Scott continues stealth jobs mission

Nobody’s biting yet, but Gov. Rick Scott remains in Tennessee’s capital city for a second day of business recruitment.

The governor’s schedule showed Scott meeting early Thursday with building materials manufacturer Louisiana-Pacific Corp., better known as LP, in Nashville, followed by a meeting simply listed as “business development meeting.”

The trip, which kicked off without any pre-announced hoopla as had been his style when venturing the past couple of years into states with Democratic governors — including Connecticut, Pennsylvania, New York and California — featured meetings Wednesday with officials from Tractor Supply Co. in Brentwood, Tenn., along with Nashville-based electronics company Griffin Technology and tire company Bridgestone Americas.

By Jim Turner.

 

Another Fla Dems-backed TV ad starring Trump

Florida Dems are unleashing a TV ad using the man who is sure to become Democrats’ most popular whipping boy — President Donald Trump — in the battle for an open Miami-Dade County state Senate seat.

Democrat Annette Taddeo and Republican Jose Felix Diaz are duking it out over SD 40 after emerging as the winners in last month’s special election primaries. The redrawn Senate seat became available when former state Sen. Frank Artiles, a Republican, was forced to step down after a profanity-laced and racially charged outburst at a private club midway through this year’s legislative session.

The ad, released in English and Spanish in the district where 75 percent of the population is Hispanic, links Diaz — a supporter of the president who once appeared on his TV show, “The Apprentice” — opens with Taddeo watching the now-infamous clip of Trump slamming a bad guy in a WWF stunt.

“Families are too busy to worry about this drama,” Taddeo says, after turning off the TV.

She later alleges that “Jose Felix Diaz supports Trump’s every move,” highlighting services for seniors and coverage of pre-existing medical conditions that would be lost if Trump gets his way and kills the Affordable Care Act, better known as “Obamacare.”

The Florida Democratic Party announced the launch of the ad not long after national Dems said they intend to fork over $150,000 in the SD 40 race.

Yesterday, state Democrats released an ad tying former St. Petersburg mayor Rick Baker to Trump. Baker is trying to unseat incumbent Democrat Rick Kriseman.

Nelson sweeps through Panhandle

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U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson with supporters in Tallahassee Tuesday.

Congress has gone on its August recess, giving U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson the opportunity to spend two days working on something he’s specialized in throughout his lengthy career: retail politics.

Starting early Monday morning in Pensacola, the three-term Democratic senator hit more than a half-dozen spots in the Florida Panhandle before flying back to Orlando on Tuesday evening from Tallahassee.

After leaving Pensacola, Nelson made two stops in Walton County and two in Bay County,  and visited Bonifay and Chipley before winding up in Tallahassee.

He can tell you about dredging plans at the Port of Panama City as well as roads and a sewage plant “in desperate need” of repair in Esto, a town of fewer than 400 in Washington County.

But that’s classic Nelson, the Democrats’ only statewide office holder, who has never shied away from the rural conservative regions of the state even though voters there have become increasingly stalwart Republicans.

He’s comfortable in the Panhandle, a region where his great-great grandfather got off a boat in Port St. Joe and made his way to Orange Hill, a tiny farming community in Washington County.

He explained his campaigning style during his successful 2012 re-election campaign against former U.S. Rep. Connie Mack, R-Fort Myers.

“People wonder why I do well in North Florida — where a lot of national Democrats don’t necessarily do well — because I work it like a dog,” Nelson said at the time. “I go into those little rural communities and hold those town hall meetings so that I can hear from them.”

The efforts don’t mean Nelson will carry many counties west of Tallahassee in his 2018 re-election bid. But based on his prior results, he can keep the vote close in places like Gulf and Washington counties and perhaps reduce the margin in counties like Bay.

Nelson is expected to face Republican Gov. Rick Scott’s formidable money and messaging machine next year, with some suggesting this will be Nelson’s greatest challenge.

Asked to give odds on next year’s race, Nelson demurred — sort of.

“I’m not one to go around and crow and huff and puff and beat my chest, but I know how to campaign. I’ll leave it at that,” he said.

By Lloyd Dunkelberger.