guns

Now Hammer’s set her sights on YETI

L_Main_Blue_F_Up_Expanded_Tundra_RoadieThe National Rifle Association is targeting YETI after the Texas-based maker of high-dollar cups and coolers dropped its sponsorship of the Friends of NRA Foundation Banquet and Auction events around the country, according to an alert issued by NRA Florida lobbyist Marion Hammer today.

The YETI coolers “have been a hot item for sportsmen” at the events for years, according to Hammer’s alert.

“Suddenly, without prior notice, YETI has declined to do business with The NRA Foundation saying they no longer wish to be an NRA vendor, and refused to say why.  They will only say they will no longer sell products to The NRA Foundation.  That certainly isn’t sportsmanlike. In fact, YETI should be ashamed.  They have declined to continue helping America’s young people enjoy outdoor recreational activities.  These activities enable them to appreciate America and enjoy our natural resources with wholesome and healthy outdoor recreational and educational programs,” the alert reads. “In this day and age, information is power.  We thought you needed this information.”

The NRA Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit, charitable organization, according to the alert, which also includes a link to YETI’s online contact service.

Broxson defends vote that made him a Hammer target

Panhandle Republican Sen. Doug Broxson shot back at a both-guns-smoking attack from Florida NRA lobbyist Marion Hammer, who targeted the Gulf Breeze lawmaker for what she considered caving on a school-safety measure earlier this month.
Hammer targeted Broxson this week in one of her venerable “alerts” issued to NRA supporters.
The focus of the attack was SB 7026, the school-safety measure passed in response to the Feb. 14 massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland.
To put it mildly, Hammer was less than pleased with provisions in the measure that raised from 18 to 21 and imposed a three-day waiting period to purchase long guns, such as the rifle — purchased legally and without any waiting period last year — used by 19-year-old gunman Nikolas Cruz to kill 14 students and four faculty members on Valentine’s Day.

 

Broxson, Hammer wrote in red highlights in her email missive, was “the linchpin” in the vote in favor of the Senate measure.

“If Doug Broxson had kept his word, the bill would have been killed in the Senate and Senate leadership would have had to start over and bring back a true school safety bill without the gun control provisions. But at the last minute, Broxson caved to threats and promises from Senate leadership and switched his vote and sold you out,” she wrote.

We reached out to Broxson yesterday to give him an opportunity to respond to Hammer’s attack.

Here’s what he had to say:

“I am a strong defender of the second amendment and a strong defender of the NRA, and that will never change. What we did with the school safety bill is harden our schools, increase school security, and increase measures to stop mentally or emotionally ill individuals from causing carnage in a one-day, one-moment transaction. I am proud of my role in that effort, and I know that the one thing the voters in my district will reward every election is decisive leadership,” he said.

Federal judge shoots down goat farmer’s request to intervene in NRA lawsuit

geiten-1445270021WfYHe says he lives near “one of the worst gun pits” and “has had bullets fly over his head,” but that’s no reason Palatka goat farmer Mitchell Williams should be allowed to  join in a federal lawsuit filed by the National Rifle Association last month, according to U.S. District Judge Mark Walker.

Walker on Friday denied Williams’ at-times-hilarious motion to intervene in the challenge, filed by the NRA almost immediately after Gov. Rick Scott signed a sweeping school-safety law on March 9.

The NRA’s complaint focuses on a provision in the new law that raised from 18 to 21 the age to purchase long guns, including semi-automatic rifles like the one 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz last year bought legally in Florida and used to slaughter 17 people and injure 17 others at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Feb. 14. The NRA alleges  the new age requirement, already in place to purchase handguns, is unconstitutional.

Williams, the goat farmer, wants to ban the sale of bullets to  prevent future school shootings.

“The sale and purchase of ammunition is the weak leak to the trail of lunacy leading to many of these shootings,” Williams wrote in his eight-page motion.

The lack of bullets, shells, etc., “will mean that the gun is more or less dangerous than a steel pipe of the same weight and size, he wrote.

As good (or bad) as Williams’ logic might be, Walker didn’t buy it.

Williams doesn’t have any express right to intervene in the case, even though he asserted he has an “obvious interest in seeing that students are not murdered that might have bought one or more of (his) goats,” as the judge noted in his order denying the goat farmer’s motion.

“Having read Mr. Williams’s motion, it seems that his qualms are better suited for resolution by a legislature than by this Court,” Walker wrote.

Williams maintains that the new law does not go far enough and proposes a new restriction on  and proposes “alternative solutions,” such as restrictions on the sale and use of ammunition, Walker noted.

But, the judge wrote, “It is not this Court’s job to fashion new laws.”

“If Mr. Williams wants to share his ideas with the Florida Legislature, he is more than welcome to,” Walker concluded.

In a footnote, Walker even gave Williams a little assistance, should the Palatka man decide to take the judge’s advice, by providing a link to the “contact us” section of the Florida Legislature’s website.

 

NRA targets “anti-gun” CRC members, shames Corcoran on school-safety bill

gun-pistolFlorida NRA lobbyist Marion Hammer took aim at the Constitution Revision Commission and House Speaker Richard Corcoran today, in separate “alerts” issued regarding past and proposed gun-related measures.
This morning, Hammer called out Corcoran for praising the new law that raised the age from 18 to 21 and imposed a three-day waiting period for the purchase of long guns, such as the AR-15-style weapon used by Nikolas Cruz to shoot dead 14 students and three staff at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Valentine’s Day. The new law also bans bump stocks.
And the new law allows some teachers and other school personnel, who are specially trained and deputized by local sheriffs, to bring guns to school, a provision some pro-gun proponents like Corcoran are cheering because it does away with more than 4,000 “gun-free zones” — a.k.a. “schools.”
But Hammer, who sent out an email with the subject line “ALERT: We Were Born at Night But It Wasn’t Last Night, Mr. Speaker,” isn’t buying it.
She’s accusing the Land O’ Lakes Republican of “adding insult to injury” with his remarks.
“Corcoran tried to justify his treachery by ignoring the damaging gun control he supported and then claimed the effort to arm school employees makes it ‘one of the greatest Second Amendment victories we’ve ever had’ because it ends “gun free zones on school campuses.”  That is complete nonsense,” Hammer wrote in an email today.
Later in the day, Hammer set her sights on the CRC, the once-every-20-years panel that can place constitutional amendments directly on the ballot. In the aftermath of the Feb. 14 mass shooting in Parkland, several commissioners have proposed gun-related measures, ranging from a ban on assault weapons to codifying the changes in the new state law in the state Constitution.
That drew this missive from Hammer:
ALERT: Anti-gun CRC Members Want Gun Bans in the Florida Constitution


Some of the members of the Florida Constitution Revision Commission (CRC) are very anti-gun and they are proposing and pushing gun ban and gun control amendments to put in the Florida Constitution.

Commissioners will be voting on these amendment soon. Links to these amendments are listed at the bottom.

Among these amendments are:

*An “assault weapons” ban which bans the distribution, sale, transfer, and possession of so-called assault weapons and any detachable magazine that has a capacity of more than 9 rounds.  (Makes possession illegal with no compensation provided for those already possessed that must be surrendered)

*A ban on any semi-automatic rifle that is able to accept a detachable magazine or has a fixed magazine capable of holding more than10 rounds. (that means almost all semi-automatic rifles)

*A ban on the sale and transfer of “assault weapons” and defines “transfer” as the conveyance “from a person or entity to another person or entity WITHOUT any conveyance of money or other valuable consideration.”  (Note: to “convey” between persons without compensation could mean the simple act of handing the firearm to another person while hunting, on the range, or anywhere)

*A 10 day waiting period (excluding weekends and legal holidays) on all firearms to facilitate a background check.

*A ban on the purchase of any firearm by a person under 21 years of age.

*A ban on the sale, transfer and possession of bump stocks and other devises, tools, kits, etc.

Please email CRC Commissioners and tell them to OPPOSE gun control amendments!

PLEASE DO IT NOW !!! They could be voting on these amendments at anytime

IN THE SUBJECT LINE PUT:  VOTE AGAINST GUN CONTROL AMENDMENTS

UPDATE: Deutch, Moskowitz blast Putnam, DeSantis on guns

IMG_0075UPDATE: Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam’s government office responded to the blog with a schedule from Feb. 20 showing a one-hour visit to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. And Putnam’s gubernatorial campaign spokeswoman, Amanda Bevis, had this to say:

“It’s no surprise the Democrats are selling a story full of untruths. If they did their research, they would know that Adam Putnam has in fact visited the school, has met with the students and mourned with them for their loss, and has met with law enforcement officials and the Governor to discuss what we as a state can do to prevent further tragedies like the massacre that took the lives of so many innocent Floridians. It’s the Democrats who are politicizing this tragedy – using falsehoods to further their own agenda of limiting our Second Amendment rights. The monster in Parkland, who was a red flag that should have never gotten his hands on a gun, cannot and should not be compared to law-abiding citizens who seek to defend themselves and their families.”

 

 

Congressman Ted Deutch and state Rep. Jared Moskowitz shredded U.S. Rep. Ron DeSantis and Florida Ag Commish Adam Putnam — Republicans in a heated race to succeed Gov. Rick Scott — over a new school-safety law and gun regulations in general.

The Florida Dems — who aren’t running for governor, as far as we know — spoke to reporters during a conference call Monday morning, with Moskowitz challenging both “empty suit” Putnam and DeSantis to a debate on the issue.

“I’ll meet in Taylor County, if that’s what they want,” Moskowitz, a Coral Springs Democrat who graduated from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, where 14 students and three staff were slaughtered on Feb. 14.

Scott recently signed into law a measure, aimed at the Parkland massacre, that raises the age from 18 to 21 and imposes a three-day waiting period for the purchase of long guns, such as the semi-automatic rifle used by 19-year-old gunman Nikolas Cruz on Valentine’s Day. The new law also bans bump stocks, which can make semi-automatic weapons mimic fully automatic guns.

Moskowitz condemned Putnam, who has said he would not have signed the bill into law, for failing to visit the school, something Scott and the other members of the Florida Cabinet did, and for not meeting with students who traveled to the Capitol to lobby  for school safety measures and stricter gun regulations.

“He hid in his office on the ground floor while everybody else was trying to figure out how we work together to keep kids safe in schools,” Moskowitz said during the conference call.

DeSantis, too, “did not bring anything to the table,” according to Moskowitz.

“Would he have signed the bill? He should be challenged to answer that question,” he said.

The call was a taste of what’s sure to come as the race to replace Scott heats up, now that the Legislature’s packed up and gone home.

“It’s pretty clear that anyone who spends five minutes looking at the records of both my colleague, Congressman DeSantis, and Adam Putnam that they’ve chosen their A-rating from the NRA over their concern about public safety, the lives of kids, the city of Parkland and the state of Florida. And that makes them both unfit to serve as governor of the state,” Deutch said.

DeSantis’ lengthy pro-gun voting record  “has shown utter disregard for and rejection of the kind of common sense measures that can help save lives,” Deutch said.

 

Dad of slain Marjory Stoneman Douglas student: “I’m a father, and I’m on a mission”

Andrew Pollack’s 18-year-old daughter, Meadow, was among the 14 students shot dead at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Feb. 14.

Pollack, who watched from the gallery as the Florida House voted 67-50 to approve the school-safety measure sparked by the nation’s second-worst school shooting, that also left three faculty members dead, Wednesday evening.

He praised the House, Senate and Gov. Rick Scott, and called the measure an important first step to ensure the safety and security of school children.

“On a personal note, my precious daughter Meadow’s life was taken and there’s nothing I can do to change that. But make no mistake, I’m a father and I’m on mission. I’m on a mission to ensure that I’m the last dad to ever read a statement of this kind. If you want to help me, and keep my children safe, I want you to follow me cuz there’s strength in numbers, at remembermeadow.com.”

Here’s Pollack speaking to reporters immediately after the vote.

 

Grieving fathers to House: “Come together as the families have done”

IMG_2951(1)As some House Democrats argued against a school safety proposal they maintain contains a “poison pill” that would allow school personnel — including some teachers — to carry guns to school, the parents of two slain students pleaded with the Legislature to pass the bill.

Andy Pollack’s 18-year-old daughter Meadow died in the Feb. 14 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, and Ryan Petty’s 14-year-old daughter Alaina was also among the 14 students and three faculty members killed in the nation’s second-worst school shooting at the Parkland school.

The grieving fathers spoke to reporters Wednesday as the House debated the school safety measure (SB 7026), and even as a handful of Democrats spoke against it.

“There’s so much good in this bill that it needs to pass,” Pollack said. Last night, the families of the 17 students and teachers sent a letter to House members, urging them to pass the bill.

“If anyone’s voting against it in their, they have a different agenda than what their community has, which is protecting our kids and making them safe,” Pollack, who was one of the parents who met with President Donald Trump at the White House, has  appeared on national television speaking out in favor of school safety. “Whoever’s voting no, doesn’t have the interests of the kids in the community as their best interest.”

Petty said that the families had different opinions and come from different backgrounds.

“We came together. We’re united behind this legislation. And our ask is that the Florida House come together as the families have done and pass this bill,” he said.

Pollack said he can’t understand why any lawmaker would oppose the bill, a $400 million package that includes money for early mental health screening and school hardening.

“Whether you’re a Democrat or a Republican, there’s everything that’s good in this bill that’s good for the community. Sure, there’s a couple of things … Nothing in life’s ever perfect. But a majority of this bill is going to help the communities,” he said.

Petty agreed, brushing off questions about the lack of an assault weapons ban sought by many of the Douglas High students who lobbied lawmakers and Gov. Rick Scott on the bill.

“We’re not focused on the individual provisions of this. There’s enough good in the middle of this bill that everybody can agree on and that’s what we’d ask the Legislature to do. Focus on the things you agree on, not the things you disagree with,” said Petty, who, accompanied by Scott, made direct appeals to the House and Senate during floor sessions last week. As Andy said, this is about keeping our kids safe in their schools. It’s not about political agendas. Set them aside. Vote to pass this legislation and let’s protect our kids. We can lead in Florida,” he said.