Cuba

Rubio: Trump admin response to Cuba “weak, unacceptable, and outrageous”

First he criticized President Donald Trump’s administration for a lackluster response to the “humanitarian crisis” developing in Puerto Rico following Hurricane Maria.

Now, U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio lambasted Trump’s state department for its handling of attacks on American diplomats in Cuba.

The U.S. Department of State announced Friday it is yanking more than half its staff from the American embassy in Havana, following mysterious attacks affecting nearly two-dozen staffers.

In a statement released Friday, Rubio blasted the Trump administration as “weak, unacceptable and outrageous” for not tossing Cuban diplomats out of the U.S.

Here’s Rubio’s full statement:

“In light of these harmful attacks against American diplomatic personnel in Cuba, it is weak, unacceptable and outrageous for the U.S. State Department to allow Raul Castro to keep as many of his operatives in the U.S. as he wants. The Cuban government has failed its obligation under international treaties to keep foreign diplomats safe on its soil. The idea that Cuba knows nothing about how these attacks took place and who perpetrated them is absurd. The State Department must conduct its own investigation independent of the Castro regime and submit a comprehensive report to Congress. Until those responsible for these attacks are brought to justice, the U.S. should immediately expel an equal number of Cuban operatives, downgrade the U.S. embassy in Havana to an interests section, and consider relisting Cuba as a state sponsor of terrorism.”

U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, a Democrat, also released a statement, calling the attacks on the American embassy personnel “inexcusable.”

Here’s what Nelson had to say:

“The fact that the Cuban government isn’t protecting the health and wellbeing of our U.S. Embassy personnel is inexcusable. With the loss of hearing and stroke-like-symptoms, the Cuban government owes an explanation and reparations to the families of those injured and must work to ensure these attacks cease immediately. In the meantime, the Cuban Embassy’s staff in Washington, D.C. should be reduced by the same proportionate number of U.S. personnel recalled.”

Scott gleeful about Georgia election as referendum on fellow Florida-man Trump

All of those who are completely over the Georgia special election can stop reading here.

But for the rest of us, here’s what Florida Gov. Rick Scott had to say about the face-off that was viewed by many to be a referendum on Scott’s pal, President Donald Trump.

Screen Shot 2017-06-21 at 12.55.54 PM

Appearing on FOX Business show Varney & Co. Wednesday, Scott echoed those hyping Republican Karen Handel’s victory in the most expensive congressional race in history.

Watch the latest video at video.foxbusiness.com

Handel’s 6th Congressional District win was a victory for Trump, Scott crowed.

“It shows you that it doesn’t matter how much money you have. If you have a bad message, you lose,” Scott, who spent at least $70 million of his own money in his 2010 gubernatorial bid, said.

 Trump’s message of “jobs and repealing and replacing Obamacare” — themes the Florida governor, mulling a run for the U.S. Senate next year, has hammered on — resonated with voters, Scott indicated.

Scott also tried to slip this week’s job-poaching trip to Connecticut into the conversation focused on national politics. And he also addressed the New Republic super-PAC, which he chairs, that seeks to rebrand the Republican Party in Trump’s image.

 “If you look at what we should be talking about, we ought to talk how Americans talk,” Scott said. “They’re not talking about liberal vs. conservative. They’re talking about, ‘I want an open government. I want choices. I want choices in my education. I want choices in my health care.’ That’s how Trump talked.”

 New Republican’s focus is on cutting regulations, targeting young voters and winning Hispanic voters.

Referring to the latter, Scott told FOX that Cubans in South Florida are “all on board” with the president’s Cuban policy introduced Friday in Miami. The new policy aims to reverse many of the actions of former President Barack Obama designed to open up thaw relations with the island country.

“The Cuban people know that you can’t help the Castro regime,” Scott said Wednesday. “It doesn’t work. There is nothing that Obama did that helped give freedom, democracy.”