Florida Democratic Party

Dems to Putnam: Don’t let the door hit you …

Former Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam’s exit from the public sector — and from the Sunshine State — won’t be missed by the Florida Democratic Party.

unnamedMemphis-based Ducks Unlimited on Wednesday named Putnam, who was the “establishment” favorite in last year’s GOP gubernatorial primary but was trounced by Gov. Ron DeSantis, as its chief executive.

Florida Democratic Party spokesman Kevin Donohoe bid an actual “good riddance” to the former congressman from Bartow.

“Over the course of his twenty-year career in politics, Adam Putnam endangered Floridians’ safety, helped destroy our environment and turned the Department of Agriculture into a national embarrassment,” Donohoe said in a statement. “Putnam is the ultimate career politician and his name will forever be associated with scandal, incompetence and corruption in Florida. Putnam always promised to put Florida First, and he’s finally done that by leaving the state and giving up on public life. Good riddance.”

The announcement from Ducks Unlimited notes that Putnam “plans to move to Memphis in the coming months.”

“My vision for DU is to bring together conservation-minded folks from all walks of life, whether they’re farmers, city-dwellers, veterans, biologists, hunters…anyone who has a connection to landscapes, which is everyone,” Putnam said in DU release. “If we are going to fill the skies with waterfowl, we must build a coalition of people who believe waterfowl-filled skies matter. We need to work together to reach a common goal of healthy wetlands and abundant water for wildlife, people and their communities across North America.”

By Jim Turner.

Dems throw musical shade at Scott

Florida Democrats have served up a musical serving of sarcasm aimed at Gov. Rick Scott, who finally stopped the (non)suspense and announced this week he’s running against U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson.

The Dems’ “Smooth Criminal for Senate” playlist features hits by Beyoncé, Michael Jackson, Kanye West and The Notorious B.I.G.,

Some of the samples are obvious, such as two versions of “Plead the Fifth” (“couldn’t find 75 songs with the title,” the press release accompanying the playlist reads), a reference to the former health care mogul’s repeated use of the Fifth Amendment during a deposition ages ago.

Other selections, like “Robots” by Flight of the Concords, are a tad more subtle.

And of course there’s a reference to onetime First Dog Reagan, a yellow lab who was a brief resident of the governor’s mansion, with “Who Let the Dogs Out.”

We could have lived without “Oil Rigs,” and the G-rated version of “Gold Digger” doesn’t quite cut it, but hey, we get it.

The Fla Dems might be taking a page from President Obama, whose summer (day and night) Spotify playlists — featuring Bob Dylan, The Isley Brothers, Coldplay, Howlin’ Wolf, to name just a few — were a huge hit.

No indication yet if President Trump will carry on the tradition.

Here’s a link to the playlist, and here are the tracks:

  • Smooth Criminal by Michael Jackson
  • Who Let the Dogs Out by Baha Men – Where’s Reagan?
  • Mo Money Mo Problems by Notorious B.I.G., Mase, Diddy
  • The First Cut is the Deepest by Sheryl Crow -The first cut was just the beginning.
  • Plead the Fifth by Kip Moore
  • Plead the Fifth by Liana Banks – Couldn’t find 75 songs with the title.
  • Me, Myself and I by Beyonce
  • Life’s Been Good by Joe Walsh
  • Selfish by Future and Rihanna
  • Gold Digger by Kanye West and Jamie Foxx
  • Criminal by Britney Spears
  • Oil Rigs by Atena
  • Robots by Flight of the Conchords

 

Cory Booker in the house — for Nelson

bookerU.S. Sen. Cory Booker — a Democratic rock star — is headlining a fundraiser for fellow Sen. Bill Nelson in Tallahassee next month.

Booker, who was the mayor of Newark before heading to D.C. in 2013, will be the main draw at an April 14 luncheon at the home of Altha Manning, according to an invite posted on Twitter by Allison Tant, a former head of the Florida Democratic Party.

nelson fundraiser

Nelson, a veteran politico who’s represented Florida in the U.S. Senate for 17 years, could be in a face-off against Republican Gov. Rick Scott. Scott, who is forced out of the governor’s office due to term limits, is expected to announce his intentions soon.

 

Monica Russo mulling “every potential path” to become Florida Democratic Party boss

Monica Russo, the head of the SEIU in Florida, isn’t backing down from her bid to take over as chief of the Florida Democratic Party, even though the party’s infrastructure seems stacked against her.

Russo isn’t a chair of a county DEC, and she isn’t a state committeewoman, the two things that would make a potential candidate eligible for the post, according to FDP general counsel Mark Herron.

But Russo is questioning whether the rules about the selection of a chair apply to the current situation, effectively a “special election” to replace former chairman Stephen Bittel, who abruptly quit the post last month after being accused by female aides and consultants of creating a hostile work environment. Party leaders will vote on his successor at a meeting in Orlando on Dec. 9.

Alma Gonzalez, Terrie Rizzo and Stacey Patel are also vying for the post.

Russo, and many other Democratic activists, say the rules should allow any Democrat to run for the party’s top post.

Here’s the full statement from Russo, issued late last evening:

As Democrats, we have an obligation to continue to be the party for openness and inclusion. Any loyal Democrat who has been in the trenches working as part of the Democratic coalition should have the opportunity to be considered for the role of state party Chair.

“The restrictive interpretation of the current rules caused 3 of 5 candidates to move or maneuver to be eligible in the last race, including a former Democratic Senator who for years had been a champion in Tallahassee. Their work as part of the Democratic coalition was not made because of where they lived, but rather their dedication to our movement.

“This interpretation of the rules is archaic. The by-laws are not meant to keep out the very people who have worked side by side, inside and outside the party.

“As I’ve learned, the restrictive eligibility requirements for Chair are specific to electing a chair at the reorganization meeting that happens once every four years, when the seat is up for election. This upcoming meeting of the state executive committee is not a reorganization meeting and as such a number of legal minds have opined that those requirements don’t apply to filling vacancies — suggesting that the eligibility is already opened. I am asking for clarity on this point and will be asking the Florida Democratic Party to offer an opinion.

“I’ve also received a number of calls from people all over the state -smaller and larger counties alike- who have suggested ways to help me become eligible under the most restrictive interpretation. While I do not desire to move and am not inclined to do so, I am considering every potential path to eligibility.”

Fla Dems: We’re not in disarray

Florida Dems are using St. Pete Mayor Rick Kriseman’s “big win” Tuesday — as well as victories in Virginia, Washington and New Jersey — as proof that their party has got it together.

Florida Democratic Party Chairman Stephen Bittel sent out an email to supporters this morning piggybacking on the victories to raise money.

“These wins proved that Democrats aren’t in disarray, but working harder than ever to rebuild our party after 2016.

But, between now and Election Day 2018, we know a lot can happen. That is why now that Democrats have won big, we’re not resting in Florida — we’re working harder than ever before.

“We can’t do that though if we don’t raise $1O,OOO before the end of the day today. Can you click here and donate $5 now?”  Bittel wrote.

Kriseman, the incumbent, defeated former mayor Rick Baker in a hotly contested race that was technically non-partisan but in which major party players — like former VP Joe Biden — participated.

Dems are banking that the strategies used in Tuesday’s elections will provide a playbook going into next year’s elections, where Florida Democrats hope to flip legislative seats and win back the governor’s mansion, which has been in GOP hands for nearly two decades.

Dems bash rebranded Baker in St. Pete

It may have worked it Miami, so why not St. Pete?

Florida Dems and incumbent St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman’s campaign have tethered Rick Baker, a Republican who’s seeking a comeback as mayor, to President Donald Trump, who’s not exactly a rock star in the left-leaning Pinellas County seat.

Dems used the same strategy in a Miami special election in August, successfully pairing Trump with former state Rep. Jose Felix Diaz. The Miami Republican and his allies vastly outspent Democratic opponent Annette Taddeo in the race for the open Senate seat, but Taddeo coasted to victory.

In advance of the advent of early voting tomorrow, Florida Democrats released a new ad bashing Baker, again tying him to the president.

“The new Rick Baker: angry, deceptive and backwards,” a voiceover says.

“Rick Baker is taking a page from Donald Trump’s playbook. He’s willing to say or do anything to win an election—anything besides challenge Donald Trump. Even when Trump embraced white supremacists, Baker was silent. Now that his campaign is flailing, he’s willing to lie if it means getting his old job back. Baker seems to have traded his dignity for $25,000 from the RNC,” Florida Democratic Party Deputy Communications Director Amir Avin said in a press release announcing the ad.

White nationalist speech at UF: Should I stay or should I go?

Gov. Rick Scott, Attorney General Pam Bondi and University of Florida President Kent Fuchs are urging students, faculty and others to shun firebrand white nationalist Richard Spencer, who’s speaking at the college tomorrow.

But Florida Democrats issued a press release this morning saying they support peaceful protestors and it’s incumbent on those who disagree with Spencer to speak out.

“The Florida Democratic Party reiterates its support for all peaceful protesters who are standing up and speaking out,” Florida Democratic Party Chairman Stephen Bittel said in the release. “We have a moral obligation to refute hate and bigotry whenever they present themselves. White supremacy is an evil we cannot ignore. When leaders like our governor fail to challenge the President for embracing white supremacists, it becomes all the more urgent that the rest of us speak out—clearly, unequivocally, and loudly. We must let it be known that we reject hatred in all its forms.”
Responding to a request by Alachua County Sheriff Sadie Darnell, Scott on Monday declared a state of emergency for the county. The executive order allows for coordination between state and local law enforcement agencies. Darnell said her request wasn’t based on any heightened security risks, but was a preventative measure.

Speaking to reporters after a Cabinet meeting this morning, Bondi said she was praying “nothing happens” and urged students not to go to the event, while saying “there is no place for espousing these horrible, horrible views.”

Bondi said law enforcement will be well-prepared.

But, she added, “There is just no place right now for this, but you know with free speech, if he’s going to get up there and do it, then he’s going to do it. But we are going to make sure that our students and our citizens are protected.”

Spencer, the head of the National Policy Institute, was among the speakers at a “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Va., that turned deadly when a car plowed into a group of counter-protestors. Heather Heyer was killed and dozens of others were injured.
Clashes between Spencer supporters, some of whom are white supremacists and others who back his white separatist ideology, and “Antifa,” or anti-fascist, groups have taken place on other campuses where Spencer has spoken.