Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School

Dad of slain Marjory Stoneman Douglas student: “I’m a father, and I’m on a mission”

Andrew Pollack’s 18-year-old daughter, Meadow, was among the 14 students shot dead at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Feb. 14.

Pollack, who watched from the gallery as the Florida House voted 67-50 to approve the school-safety measure sparked by the nation’s second-worst school shooting, that also left three faculty members dead, Wednesday evening.

He praised the House, Senate and Gov. Rick Scott, and called the measure an important first step to ensure the safety and security of school children.

“On a personal note, my precious daughter Meadow’s life was taken and there’s nothing I can do to change that. But make no mistake, I’m a father and I’m on mission. I’m on a mission to ensure that I’m the last dad to ever read a statement of this kind. If you want to help me, and keep my children safe, I want you to follow me cuz there’s strength in numbers, at remembermeadow.com.”

Here’s Pollack speaking to reporters immediately after the vote.

 

Grieving fathers to House: “Come together as the families have done”

IMG_2951(1)As some House Democrats argued against a school safety proposal they maintain contains a “poison pill” that would allow school personnel — including some teachers — to carry guns to school, the parents of two slain students pleaded with the Legislature to pass the bill.

Andy Pollack’s 18-year-old daughter Meadow died in the Feb. 14 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, and Ryan Petty’s 14-year-old daughter Alaina was also among the 14 students and three faculty members killed in the nation’s second-worst school shooting at the Parkland school.

The grieving fathers spoke to reporters Wednesday as the House debated the school safety measure (SB 7026), and even as a handful of Democrats spoke against it.

“There’s so much good in this bill that it needs to pass,” Pollack said. Last night, the families of the 17 students and teachers sent a letter to House members, urging them to pass the bill.

“If anyone’s voting against it in their, they have a different agenda than what their community has, which is protecting our kids and making them safe,” Pollack, who was one of the parents who met with President Donald Trump at the White House, has  appeared on national television speaking out in favor of school safety. “Whoever’s voting no, doesn’t have the interests of the kids in the community as their best interest.”

Petty said that the families had different opinions and come from different backgrounds.

“We came together. We’re united behind this legislation. And our ask is that the Florida House come together as the families have done and pass this bill,” he said.

Pollack said he can’t understand why any lawmaker would oppose the bill, a $400 million package that includes money for early mental health screening and school hardening.

“Whether you’re a Democrat or a Republican, there’s everything that’s good in this bill that’s good for the community. Sure, there’s a couple of things … Nothing in life’s ever perfect. But a majority of this bill is going to help the communities,” he said.

Petty agreed, brushing off questions about the lack of an assault weapons ban sought by many of the Douglas High students who lobbied lawmakers and Gov. Rick Scott on the bill.

“We’re not focused on the individual provisions of this. There’s enough good in the middle of this bill that everybody can agree on and that’s what we’d ask the Legislature to do. Focus on the things you agree on, not the things you disagree with,” said Petty, who, accompanied by Scott, made direct appeals to the House and Senate during floor sessions last week. As Andy said, this is about keeping our kids safe in their schools. It’s not about political agendas. Set them aside. Vote to pass this legislation and let’s protect our kids. We can lead in Florida,” he said.

 

MSD families: “The time to act is now”

AlyssaAlhadeffWith the Florida House poised to pass a sweeping bill addressing mental health, school safety and guns, the families of the 17 victims of the Marjory Douglas Stoneman High School massacre last night signed off on the legislation.

March 6, 2018
Florida State House Representative,

We are the families of the victims killed in the tragedy at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on February 14, 2018. We strongly urge you to support the passage of SB 7026 ‐ Public Safety.

You must act to prevent mass murder from ever occurring again at any school. This issue cannot wait.

The moment to pass this bill is now.

We must be the last families to suffer the loss of a loved one due to a mass shooting at a school. We demand action by the entire Florida Legislature to keep our schools safe.

Vote “YES” on SB 7026 ‐ Public Safety

This Time Must Be Different!

Sincerely,

Lori Alhadeff, Max Schachter, Ryan Petty, Linda Beigel Schulman, Fred Guttenberg, Damian and Denise
Loughran, Manuel and Patricia Oliver, Mitch Dworet, Jennifer and Tony Montalto, Kong Feng Wang and
Peter Wang, Andrew Pollack, Tom and Gina Hoyer, Vincent and Anne Ramsay, Miguel Duque, Debbi
Hixon, April Schentrup, and Melissa Feis

The endorsement comes after House and Senate Democrats — who largely opposed the measure (SB 70260 — repeatedly argued that the proposal lacks what parents, students and teachers from Douglas High (and elsewhere) have demanded: a ban on assault weapons and the removal of a provision allowing specially trained school personnel, including teachers, to bring guns to schools.

The House could vote on the proposal as soon as today.

Gov. Rick Scott has maintained that he opposes arming classroom teachers as well as the three-day waiting period for the purchase of long guns, also included in the bill.

The Senate on Monday included a “compromise” that would exclude individuals who “exclusively” work in classrooms from participating in the re-branded “guardian program — originally called the “school marshal” program — named after Aaron Feis, the assistant coach who heroically used his body to shield students from a hail of bullets during the Feb. 14 horror.

Tuesday’s letter from the parents and wives also comes as NRA powerhouse Marion Hammer issued an “emergency alert” accusing House leadership of “frantically bullying” members to support the “anti-gun” proposal.

EMERGENCY ALERT: House Members Need to hear from you NOW


DATE:  March 6, 2018
TO:      USF & NRA Member and Friends
FROM: Marion P. Hammer
USF Executive Director
NRA Past President

Senate Republicans Joined Anti-gun Democrats to Pass Gun Control


Yesterday, the Florida Senate voted 20 to18 to pass a bill that punishes law-citizens for the actions of a mentally ill teenager who murdered 17 people after Florida officials repeatedly refused to get him the help he needed.

The bottom line is turncoat Republicans in the Florida Senate voted with Senate Democrats to punish law-abiding citizens in Florida. A full report with the roll call vote and a list of the traitors and how they betrayed you and the Second Amendment will be forthcoming.

YOU and every law-abiding gun owner is being blamed for the atrocious act of premeditated murder. Neither the 3-day waiting period on all rifles and shotguns, raising the age from 18 to 21 to purchase any firearm, or the bump stock ban in the bill will have any effect on crime or criminals yet Senate leaders, masquerading as conservatives, rammed through gun control as part of the bill.

The bill is NOW IN THE HOUSE where House leadership is frantically bullying Second Amendment supporters to get them to vote for the gun control package.

Please EMAIL members of the Florida House IMMEDIATELY and tell them to VOTE NO ON GUN CONTROL– VOTE NO ON SB-7026.

Urge them to provide armed security in schools and tighten mental health laws to keep guns out of the hands of those who are a danger to themselves or others BUT LEAVE THE RIGHTS OF LAW-ABIDING GUN OWNERS ALONE.

DO IT NOW!!! THE BILL WILL BE ON THE HOUSE FLOOR TODAY

 

School safety measure in House’s hands

All eyes are now on the House, after a sweeping school safety measure squeaked out of the Senate on a 20-18 vote Monday evening.

But could a tweak that may have kept the bill from going down in the upper chamber result in its demise across the rotunda?

Sen. Rene Garcia, a Hialeah Republican, sponsored an amendment that would exclude individuals who “exclusively” provide classroom instruction from participating in the school marshal program, rebranded by the Senate on Monday as the “Coach Aaron Feis Guardian Program.” The controversial program would allow specially trained teachers or other school personnel to bring guns to class.

With the clock ticking down until the session ends Friday, there’s no guarantee that the House, slated to take up the bill (SB 7026) tomorrow, will pass it as is, Senate leaders acknowledged.

“It’s been a very dynamic process. There were even amendments on third reading, which is unusual for a bill of this stature,” Senate President Joe Negron, R-Stuart, told reporters late Monday evening.

“There’s some general consensus, but I wouldn’t be surprised if both the House and the Senate had some additional input into the process. But I think on some of the fundamental areas, there’s agreement,” he said.

The Senate plan also includes a provision that requires both school districts and sheriffs to sign off on the plan, while the House’s version would only require the blessing of the school boards.

Gov. Rick Scott has opposed arming teachers, and it’s unclear whether he would support the revised bill.

Sen. Bill Galvano, who’s negotiated with Speaker-Designate Jose Oliva and Scott on the proposal, said that the measure passed by the Senate Monday night “was not a deal with the House,” but was generated from “the discussion” during Saturday’s floor debate.

Garcia was a no vote, Galvano pointed out.

(Translation: If Garcia had joined the opposition on Monday, the bill would have died on a 19-19 tie.)

 

 

Bondi: ‘I would have gone in’ without a gun

Attorney General Pam Bondi claimed she would have entered the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School — even without a gun — during the Feb. 14 school shooting that left 17 people dead.

Bondi’s comments Monday come as investigations into the actions of first responders. A Broward County deputy, Scot Peterson, who was the school’s resource officer resigned after it was revealed that he remained inside his car as the slaughter went down.

“Let me put it this way, when you have a school full of students, and your duty is to protect those students, even if I didn’t have a firearm I would have gone into that scene. That’s what you do. That’s what the coach did who was a true hero,” Bondi said during an appearance Monday on FOX News show Fox & Friends.

Bondi also said that not everyone has been honest about the response from the Broward Sheriff’s office, but she did not elaborate.

“It’s all going to come out in the investigation,” Bondi said.

Gov. Rick Scott has directed the Florida Department of Law Enforcement to review the events leading up to 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz’s killing spree as well as law enforcement’s response on the day 14 students and three faculty members were killed.

The Florida House Public Integrity & Ethics Committee is set to discuss an investigation into local agency actions relating to the shooting later today.

Bondi favored Scott’s approach over demands that Broward Sheriff Scott Israel resign from politicians like House Speaker Richard Corcoran and most of House Republican caucus.

In addition to Peterson, three other deputies remained outside of the school during the mass shooting, according to media reports.

Bondi suggested that statements she’s received from some at the sheriff’s office “weren’t honest with me, nor were they honest with the governor.”

By Jim Turner.

Douglas High grad Moskowitz: Off with his head!

AlyssaAlhadeffState Rep. Jared Moskowitz, a Coral Springs Democrat, volunteered for jury duty while blasting reports that defense lawyers are trying to avoid the death penalty for Nikolas Cruz, charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder after Wednesday’s shooting spree at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School.

Moskowitz is a graduate of the Parkland school and has spent the days since Cruz’s rampage — the second-worst school shooting in the nation’s history — consoling members of the grief-stricken Broward County community.

“Frankly, it is indefensible for the prosecution or defense to already be considering whether or not the death penalty will be on the table for this domestic terrorist. The families who lost their children, who lost everything, who are broken forever must be consulted. Let them decide!” Moskowitz said in a press release Monday morning.

The 19-year-old gunman’s assault “was a methodically planned and executed mass murder,” Moskowitz, a lawyer, said.

“Not only had he carefully calculated the attack, he had an escape plan and used it. This wasn’t a suicide mission, this was an act of terror that he wanted to commit and walk away from, living to see another day, and now he wants to live again, in jail! We should not give him what he wants,” he ranted.

“If you were to ask my opinion? Off with his head! To the State Attorney: I am available for jury duty,” Moskowitz concluded.

Talking heads on Florida school shooting

IMG_0075Response to last week’s massacre of 17 people at a Parkland high school last week dominated the Sunday morning news shows.

While speaking on New York City’s AM 970, Attorney General Pam Bondi urged individuals to report online threats and comments. The FBI admitted it failed to follow up on at least one report that 19-year-old gunman Nikolas Cruz posed a danger.

“If all our kids are on Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook, and if your child sees something, they have to take it seriously,” Bondi said. “I’d rather you call it in as a parent or as a child and be wrong 100 percent of the time than not call it in.”

Meanwhile, U.S. Reps. Carlos Curbelo, a Republican from Miami, and Ted Deutch, a Democrat whose district includes Parkland, spoke of the need to address gun-safety laws while on ABC’s “This Week.”

“What we need is congressional leaders, specifically in my party, to allow some of these bills to come to the floor for debate,” Curbelo said.

Deutch said lawmakers need to listen to the students that survived the shooting, who have told him they want action.

“The difference this time is that these kids — you’ve spoken to them — the world has heard them, they’re just not going to sit back after what they experienced, after what they saw, the worst things imaginable, they’re not going to just sit back and take it,” Deutch said.

Outspoken survivors of the rampage at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School — the second worst school shooting in the nation’s history — have drawn international attention in their demands for lawmakers to do something about gun laws to prevent future tragedies like the one that took the lives of 14 of their classmates.

About 100 students are scheduled to take buses to Tallahassee Tuesday night, meet with state lawmakers on the following day and hold a rally on the steps of the Old Capitol at noon Wednesday.

“They’re going to stand up for their lives, that’s what this is about, and all of the excuses that are normally given about not getting things done and the difficulty of fighting outside groups and the gun lobby,” Deutch said. “None of that is as powerful as these students.”

Appearing on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” David Hogg, a student at the Parkland high school, said he won’t feel safe returning to class, calling out Congress to make “reasonable change” to the nation’s gun laws.

“How many more students are going to have to die and have their blood spilt in American classrooms trying to make the world a better place just because politicians refuse to take action?” Hogg said.

Appearing on the same program as Hogg, Broward County School District Superintendent Robert Runcie said he’d support the use of student records as part of background checks.

“Given what I’ve seen so far, I believe that we need a smarter system,” Runcie said. “We need a smarter infrastructure where various agencies, departments, school systems, they’re working in a more integrated, collaborative fashion to ensure that we can share data, we can share information to enhance our level of effectiveness.”

 Cruz, who has been charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder in the Parkland shooting, had been kicked out of school. The FBI has acknowledged a failure to follow protocols on a tip received about Cruz, while the Broward County Sheriff’s Office is conducting an investigation into numerous calls it had received the past few years about Cruz.

Gov. Rick Scott has demanded FBI Director Christopher Wray resign.

Rush Limbaugh, a conservative radio host from Palm Beach, appeared on Fox News Sunday, where he called for the expansion of concealed-carry laws to allow people with permits to be armed in schools.

“If we are really serious about protecting the kids, we need a mechanism to be defensive when this kind of thing — if we’re not going to take action, we better have mechanisms in these schools to stop it when it breaks out,” Limbaugh said. “If we don’t do that, then all the rest of this is nothing more than political posturing for the 2018 midterms and the 2020 election.”

The state Senate Judiciary Committee is scheduled Tuesday to hear a proposal (SB 1236) that would allow school principals or school superintendents designate people who could carry guns during school hours.

A separate measure (SB 1048), expected to go before the full state Senate on Wednesday, would alter the law that prohibits people with a concealed-carry permit from carrying at a religious facility on property that also includes a school. Currently, individuals with a permit are allowed to carry at churches and other religious institutions on property that doesn’t have accompanying education facilities.

By Jim Turner.