mushrooms

Stew ’em if ya got ’em? Denver hearts magic mushrooms

Because Colorado.

The mile-high city just got higher after Denver voters gave the thumbs-up to a proposal effectively decriminalizing magic mushrooms.

Denver will now become the first city in the nation to give the nod to psilocybin mushrooms, which can cause users to trip their brains out but which studies now show can be useful in treating depression.

Voters narrowly approved the measure by less than 2,000 votes. The Denver Post reports that some ballots have yet to be counted, but they’re not expected to change the results, which will be certified on May 16.

From the Post:

“It’s been one hell of a 21 and a half hours,” Initiative 301 campaign manager Kevin Matthews said. “If these results hold, this is an example of the absurd comedy of the great metaphor. Against all odds, we prevailed. This is what happens when a small team of dedicated and passionate people unite under a single idea to create change.”

The proposal requires the po-po to treat possession of psychedelic shrooms as their lowest priority. It’s similar to an initiative that paved the way for the legalization of pot.

Again, from the Post:

“Our victory here is a clear signal to the rest of the country that we’re ready for a broader conversation around psilocybin and its potential benefits,” said Matthews, a 33-year-old stay-at-home dad.

‘Magic’ mushrooms – the next medical pot?

psychedelic-1084082_1280The mile-high city might be getting even higher if Denver voters sign off on a proposal to decriminalize magic mushrooms.

They’re voting today on the “Denver Psilocybin Mushroom Initiative,” which would “deprioritize, to the greatest extent possible” criminal penalties “for the personal use and personal possession of psilocybin mushrooms.”

The proposal doesn’t legalize shrooms, but it would ban the city from spending any money to impose criminal penalties on folks who possess them.

The magic mushrooms, which have hallucinogenic properties, are a Schedule 1 drug under federal law.

Backers of the initiative point to research showing the health benefits of magic mushrooms (sound familiar?).

One small study found that psilocybin is “showing promise” in treating patients with depression, with the caveat that “its therapeutic mechanisms are poorly understood.”

Microdosing of LSD and magic mushrooms, which doesn’t cause users to trip their brains out, has become a thing among creative genius-types, who claim its positive effects include a boost in production.

We’re trying to think of a city in Florida where voters might give the nod to mind-bending mushrooms. St. Pete? Key West? Tweet @thedarakam with suggestions.